Congrats to our Harry Potter Raffle Winner!

The Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance, Science, Magic, and Medicine traveling exhibit will be magically disappearing soon, but it left us a prize! The winner of our candy assortment raffle is Amy Cristales, ICU RN at Rochester General. Congratulations Amy!

Amy Cristales, RN, has her prize conjured by Librarian Rachel Becker

 

Want Magnet designation? Ask a Librarian.

Hospital librarians play a vital role in helping their hospitals achieve and maintain Magnet designation.  Librarians find pertinent literature, provide instruction and editing, assist with reference management and more.

Here is a sampling of literature that describes the interprofessional partnership between hospital librarians and nursing in pursuit of Magnet designation. Rochester Regional Health employees can contact their library for copies of any of these articles.

Impact of Hospital Librarian’s Participation in the Magnet Program: A Solo Librarian’s Journey. Sinha, L. Journal of Hospital Librarianship Vol. 17 , Iss. 3,2017

The magnet journey: Opportunities for librarians to partner with nurses. Allen, M. P., Allison, M. M., Bandy, M. M., Kennedy, J. C., & Sherwill-Navarro, P. (2009). Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA, 97(4), 302-307.

Evidence-based practice mentors: Taking information literacy to the units in a teaching hospital. Arguelles, C. (2011). Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 11(1), 8-22.

Growing opportunities in the hospital library: Measuring the collection needs of hospital clinicians. Bloom, M., & Marks, L. (2013).  Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 13(2), 113-119.

Transforming practice through publication: A community hospital approach to the creation of a research-intensive environment. Brockopp, D., Hill, K., Moe, K., & Wright, L. (2016). The Journal of Nursing Administration, 46(1), 38-42.

Lifelong learning for nurses-building a strong future. Dee, C. R., & Reynolds, P. (2013). Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 32(4), 451-458.

Knowledge-based information to improve the quality of patient care. Garcia, J. L., & Wells, K. K. (2009). Journal for Healthcare Quality : Official Publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality, 31(1), 30-35.

Library support for the magnet model. (2011). National Network, 35(3), 2.

Librarian involvement in magnet criteria: A focus on new knowledge, innovations, and improvements. Liston, M. B. (2012). Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 12(2), 112-119.

Evaluation of an evidence-based practice tutorial for nurses: A useful tool and some lessons learned. Miglus, J. D., & Froman, R. D. (2016). Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 47(6), 266-271.

The road not taken: Consumer information in nursing training for magnet re-certification. Muallem, M. (2010).  Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 10(1), 64-71.

The hospital library as a “magnet force” for a research and evidence-based nursing culture: A case study of two magnet hospitals in one health system. Rourke, D. R. (2007). Medical Reference Services Quarterly, 26(3), 47-54.

Magnet again! librarian’s role in research collaboration to maintain magnet status. Schwartz, L. M., & Iobst, B. J. (2008). Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 8(1), 72-81.

Magnet hospitals/magnetic libraries — the hospital medical library: A resource for achieving magnet status. Sherwill-Navarro, P., & Roth, K. L. (2007).Journal of Hospital Librarianship, 7(3), 21-31.

Librarian-nurse partnerships support and sustain a magnet culture. Weaver, D., & Kotzer, A. M. (2011). Communicating Nursing Research, 44, 511.

Harry Potter’s World

Werner Medical Library is pleased to host the National Library of Medicine’s traveling exhibit, Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance, Science, Magic, and Medicine.

Using  materials  from  the  National  Library  of  Medicine,  the exhibit explores  Harry  Potter’s world,  its   roots  in  Renaissance  science,  and  the  ethical  questions  that  affected  not  only  the  wizards of  Harry Potter, but also the historical thinkers featured in the series.

Beginning July 7, 2017, you can visit the exhibit in the surgical family waiting area at Rochester General Hospital. The exhibit will be on display through August 12, 2017.

Read more about the exhibit here.

This exhibition was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

Clinical Alert: Candida auris

Candida auris is a rare, multidrug-resistant yeast which can cause severe fungal infections in hospitalized patients.  The CDC issued a Clinical Alert to U.S. Healthcare Facilities in June 2016.  They have also provided additional information at:

Additional information is also available through the Werner Medical Library by clicking on the linked title:

You can also “Email a Librarian” to request additional literature on this or any topic.

 

 

Fact Sheet: ACS-COT Trauma Designation

New York State adopted the American College of Surgeon’s Committee on Trauma (ACS-COT) standards and verification process for the State’s trauma system in 2013.  The ACS-COT standards allow for four levels of trauma center.  Level 3 and 4 trauma centers are community hospitals which dedicate their resources to receiving and stabilizing severely injured patients and then transfer those patients to level 1 or 2 centers.

Steps in the New York State process include:

  1. Attendance at state trauma committee meetings
  2. Consultative visit from ACS-COT
  3. Prior to the consultative, the hospital needs to have in place:
  • Trauma service
  • Trauma medical director
  • Creation of a trauma registry
  • Data submission to the NYS Trauma Registry
  • Data submission to the National Trauma Data Bank
  • 9-12 months of trauma data
  • Performance improvement process  – doesn’t have to be fully developed by the consultative visit

4.  After the consultative visit report, the hospital has 2 years to request an ACS-COT verification visit

5. Once verified, the hospital must schedule a verification visit from ACS-COT every 3 years

 

New York State Department of Health links:

New York State Trauma Program

New York State Trauma Program

 

There are four hospitals currently designated as Level 3 in New York:

Canton-Potsdam Hospital        50 Leroy St        Potsdam, NY 13676        (315) 265-3300

Southhampton Hospital        240 Meeting House Lane        Southampton, NY 11968       (516) 726-8200

St Elizabeth Medical Center        2209 Genesee St        Utica, NY 13501        (315) 798-8100

St Luke’s Cornwall Hospital/Newburgh        70 Dubois Street        Newburgh, NY 12550        (845) 561-4400

 

American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma links:

American College of Surgeon’s Committee on Trauma (ACS-COT)

Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient (2014)

      Resources for Optimal Care of the Injured Patient 2014/Resources Repository

      About the Verification, Review, and Consultation Program    

 

Other links:

Advanced Trauma Care for Nurses

American Trauma Society

National Trauma Data Bank

Trauma Center Association of America

Verified Trauma Centers FAQs  (American College of Surgeons)

Patient satisfaction when leaders round

How do patients perceive hourly rounding? Bragg L,  et al.  Nurs Manage. 2016  Nov;47(11):11-13.

Implementation of Daily Senior Leader Rounds Using a Transformational Leadership Approach. Manss, G. Nurse Leader. 15 (1) 2017, 65

Hourly rounding is key contributor to patient-centered care at high-performing
hospitals. ED Manag. 2015 Oct;27(10):109-13.

Does purposeful leader rounding make a difference? Winter M, et al. Nurs Manage. 2015 Feb;46(2):26-32.

First time rounding experiences for non-clinicians: the Cleveland Clinic experience. Greenwald LR, et al. Am J Med Qual. 2015 Mar-Apr;30(2):167-71.

The keys to making executive rounding a success. Stempniak M. Rounding into shape. Hosp Health Netw. 2014 Jul;88(7):20, 22.

Hourly rounding toolkit. (2014).  Press Ganey.

Hourly rounds and the patient experience. (2015).  Press Ganey.

From the Library to the Bedside

 

Trained hospital volunteers ask patients on 5200 if they would like to receive educational materials from the library.  The librarian fills the requests using reliable resources including MedlinePlus, ExitCare and Lexicomp.

After receiving patient education materials from the library, most patients rate themselves as “well-informed” about their requested topic.

When these patients completed the HCAHPS patient satisfaction survey, this library service was linked to a better patient experience. The program has recently expanded to 5100.

Read more about the Health Information Ambassador Program at Rochester General Hospital on page 6 of: January2017ConsumerConnections  published by the Consumer Health section of the Medical Library Association.